Evolutionary Biology at
Rutgers University

COURSES

 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES
ANTHROPOLOGY
BIOCHEMISTRY AND MICROBIOLOGY
BIOTECHNOLOGY

ENTOMOLOGY
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
GENETICS
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
MARINE SCIENCES
NATURAL RESOURCES AND ECOLOGY
PLANT SCIENCE

GRADUATE COURSES
ANTHROPOLOGY
BIOCHEMISTRY AND ANTHROPOLOGY
ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION
ENTOMOLOGY
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
OCEANOGRAPHY
PLANT SCIENCE

ANTHROPOLOGY

(see also course web page)

 

01:070:102. INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN EVOLUTION (4 credits)

Evolutionary processes, including adaptation and speciation; fossil and archaeological records of human morphological and social-behavioral evolution.

Taught by: Various

 

01:070:104. INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN EVOLUTION HONORS LABORATORY (1 credit)

Laboratory honors course to accompany 01:070:102. Topics include lab and field methodologies in physical anthropology, human fossil record, primate evolution, human evolutionary biology, and evolutionary theory.

Taught by: Staff

 

01:070:105. INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY (4 credits)

Overview of human prehistory over the past 5 million years, from origins in Africa to the spread of people first to Asia and Europe, and later to Australia and the Americas, culminating in the archaeology of colonial contact between Europe and distant lands, constructionist, and postcolonial.

Taught by: Various

 

 01:070:204. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL EVOLUTION (3 credits)

Principles underlying social evolution with special emphasis on humans: natural selection, kinship, parent-offspring conflict, parental investment, parasites, sexual selection, cooperation, deceit, and self-deception.

Taught by: Lee Cronk

 

01:070:205. EVOLUTION AND CULTURE (3 credits) 

Examination of current research on the relationship between evolutionary biology and culture. Topics include animal culture studies, cultural transmission theory, gene-culture coevolution, and the application of signaling theory to human cultural phenomena.

Taught by: Lee Cronk

 

01:070:206. SURVEY OF NEW WORLD PREHISTORY (3 credits)

Focus on the major cultural traditions and adaptations from the earliest appearance of humans in the record of the Americas through the colonial period.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:070:207. SURVEY OF OLD WORLD PREHISTORY (3 credits)

Focus on the major cultural traditions and adaptations from the earliest appearance of human lineage to the establishment of literate complex societies and early civilizations.

Taught by: Jack Harris

 

01:070:208. SURVEY OF HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY (3 credits)

Introduction to the archaeology of historic times - the interpretation of the past using both archaeological residues and the written documents. Emphasis on Africa, Britain and North America.

Taught by: Carmel Schrire

 

01:070:212. SURVEY OF THE LIVING PRIMATES (3 credits)

Introduction to the primate order, emphasizing the morphological and behavioral adaptations of the major groups.

Taught by: Ryne Palombit

 

01:070:213. ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN EVOLUTION (3 credits)

Analysis of influence of environment on evolution in record of human ancestry. Morphological and physiological adaptations of humans in reaction to environmental controls.

Taught by: Craig Fiebel

 

01:070:215. SURVEY OF FOSSIL PRIMATES (3 credits)

Outline of primate evolution; origin of primates and primate relatives; description and paleoecology of fossil species, including Paleocene and Eocene species, Malagasy lemurs, first higher primates, New World and Old World monkeys, and Miocene apes; hominid origins.

Taught by: Susan Cachel

 

01:070:326. PLEISTOCENE HOMINID ADAPTATIONS (3 credits)

Cultural and biological aspects of hominid evolution during the Pleistocene.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:070:327. POST-PLEISTOCENE HOMINID ADAPTATIONS (3 credits)

African, Asian, and European cultural developments after the Pleistocene, including origins of farming, village life, and complex society.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:070:330.  ARCHAEOLOGY OF AUSTRALASIA ( 3 credits)

The prehistory of Australasia in its worldwide perspective, with special reference to Asian origins, impact of human colonization, and interpretive models based on modern Aboriginal hunter-gatherer behavior.

Taught by: Carmel Schrire

 

01:070:332. ARCHAEOLOGY OF NORTH AMERICA (3 credits)

 Prehistory of North America from the appearance of humans on the continent to European discovery. Varieties of adaptation, cultural interrelationships, developmental trends.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:070:333. COLONIAL ARCHAEOLOGY (3 credits)

The archaeology of post-Colombian European colonial spread worldwide, with particular emphasis on North America and Africa. Strong focus on practical laboratory work, specifically analysis of colonial artifacts, including ceramics, glass, pipes, and fauna.

Taught by: Carmel Schrire

 

01:070:334. FIELD STUDY IN ARCHAEOLOGY [BA]

(Prerequisite: 01:070:105; open to juniors and seniors only. Minimum of six weeks at field location. Credit by arrangement with instructor. Course may be repeated with permission of the department.) Supervised participation in fieldwork with instruction in excavation methods and practices. Personnel and field project location vary from year to year. Fees, transportation, and expenses may vary.

Taught by: Various (summer term)

 

01:070:335. ANALYSIS OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL DATA (3 credits)

Processing and analysis of new archaeological data from supervised archaeological programs; metrical, physical, and statistical analysis may be utilized on various classes of materials

Taught by: Rob Blumenschine

 

01:070:348. PRIMATE SOCIOECOLOGY (3 credits)

Principles and data of primate ecology. Feeding and ranging behaviors. Niche separation and ecological functioning of primate social groups.

Taught by: Ryne Palombit

 

01:070:349. ADVANCED PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3 credits

Advanced evolutionary theory. Biochemical and genetic approaches. Primate morphology and behavior. Modern theories of human variability.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:070:350. PRIMATOLOGY AND HUMAN EVOLUTION (3 credits)

Anatomy, behavior, and evolution of primates. Evolution of social life. Sexual behavior, dominance, aggression, territoriality, social alliances, communication, ecology.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:070:354. FUNCTIONAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL ANATOMY OF THE

PRIMATE SKELETON (3 credits)

Morphology and function of the human/primate skeleton, integrating developmental bone biology, functional morphology and biomechanics, and descriptive musculoskeletal anatomy.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:070:356. HUMAN VARIATION (3 credits)

History of the concept of race in the west. Physical anthropological perspective, with emphases on human variation through time and on the principles of study of modern human variability.

Taught by: Susan Cachel

 

01:070:390. PLIO-PLEISTOCENE HOMINID ANATOMY (3 credits)

Human fossil record during Plio-Pleistocene; taxonomy, phylogenetics, and functional morphology. Origins of Hominidae, diversity in Australopithecus and Paranthropus, rise of Homo and of Homo sapiens. Castes and published reports; methods of inference.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:070:392. FAUNAL ANALYSIS IN ARCHAEOLOGY (3 credits) Description: Identification of animal bones, teeth, and other faunal remains in archaeological contexts. Quantifying number of individuals and skeletal elements; butchery techniques and bone modification, and their implications for archaeological interpretation.

Taught by: Robert Blumenschine

 

01:070:420. EVOLUTIONARY GENETICS: HUMANS AND OTHER PRIMATES (3 credits)

Analysis of molecular evolution of human and primate genomes, genetic and phenotypic evolution, the genetic basis of being human, and primate phylogeny. and reproduction, and social differences.

Taught by: Chi-hua Chiu

 

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MICROBIOLOGY

(see also course web page)

 

11:125:491 Microbial Ecology and BIODiversity

The course introduces students to microbial life in natural environments by focusing on the diversity of microbes and their interactions in soils, aquatic systems, the plant and animal body. Current issues in Microbial ecology and state-of-the-arts methodologies are stressed. 

Taught by: T. Barkay

 

11:126:483 Nucleotide Sequence Analysis

Taught by G. Zyjlstra

BIOTECHNOLOGY

(see also course web page)

 

11:126:481.  Molecular Genetics (3 credits)

Principles of genetics at the molecular level, including the chemical nature of hereditary material. The genetic code, regulatory mechanisms, the molecular basis of mutation, DNA replication and recombination.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

11:126:482.  Molecular Genetics Laboratory (3 credits)

Biochemical and molecular aspects of gene function and gene       recombination.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

11:126:483.  Nucleotide Sequence Analysis (3 credits)

Computer analysis of nucleotide sequences: assembly; restriction analysis; gene location and identification; protein sequence analysis and structure prediction; database searching; sequence alignments; and phylogenetic analysis.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

11:126:491.  Microbial Ecology and Diversity (4 credits)

Ecological determinants; characteristics of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; nature and activity of microbial populations; biogeochemical cycles and energy flow; microbial interactions and community structures.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

ENTOMOLOGY

(see also course web page)

 

11:370:402. AQUATIC ENTOMOLOGY (3 credits)

Identification, classification, morphology, and natural history of aquatic insects. Field work emphasizing aquatic insects of New Jersey.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

11:370:409. INSECT CLASSIFICATION (4 credits)

For students interested in insect diversity and evolution. Life histories and sight recognition of major families, especially those of economic or medical importance.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

(see also course web page)

 

11:375:201. Biological Principles of Environmental Science (3 credits)

Hazardous agents, pollution, population interactions and dynamics; biogeochemical cycles in damaged and remediated ecosystems; environmental risk, management, and remediation; human health impacts.

Taught by: J. Kukor, P. Strom and L. Young

 

11:375:411. Environmental and Pollution Microbiology (3 credits)

Microorganisms as polluters and purifiers of the environment. Biological cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and other elements; sewage and solid waste treatment; sanitary bacteriology.

Taught by: L. Young & J. Kukor

 

GENETICS

 

01:447:380. GENETICS (4 credits)

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:447:420. EVOLUTIONARY GENETICS: HUMANS AND OTHER PRIMATES (3 credits)

Molecular evolution of human and primate genomes; genetic and phenotypic evolution; the genetic basis of being human; primate phylogeny.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:447:480. TOPICS IN MOLECULAR GENETICS (3 credits)

Current research topics in microbial and molecular genetics. Lectures, discussions, and critical analysis of journal articles.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:447:481. TOPICS IN HUMAN GENETICS (3 credits)

Genetic aspects of human health and disease. Topics include birth defects, immunogenetics, cytogenetics, metabolic disorders, pattern of inheritance, and genetic counseling.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:447:486. EVOLUTIONARY GENETICS (3 credits)

Principles of evolution as revealed in DNA sequences. The effects of natural selection, genetic drift, and speciation on DNA, and the inference of histories from comparative DNA sequence data. infection, transmission, and disease control also discussed.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:447:491. MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND DIVERSITY (4 credits)

Genetic diversity: the genetic diversity of microorganisms in the environment—how it is measured and what it means; genomics of environmental microbes. Metabolic diversity: modes of microbial metabolism in the environment; geochemical cycling. Ecosystem diversity: microbial interactions; life of microbes in terrestrial, aquatic, and atmospheric environments.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
(see also course web page)

 

01:460:205. EVOLUTION AND GEOLOGIC TIME (3 credits)

Major events in the evolution of life on earth; evolutionary pattern and process through geologic time; relationship of macro- and microevolutionary theory.

Taught by: Aubry

 

01:460:206. DINOSAURS (3 credits)

Survey of dinosaurian evolution and diversity. Discovery and collection; reconstruction of anatomy, behavior, physiology, and habitats; origin, evolutionary radiation, and extinction.

Taught by: McGhee

 

01:460:208. THE LAST 11,000 YEARS (3 credits)

Geologic events since the last ice age. Sea-level changes, volcanism, earthquakes, climatic change, erosional and depositional effects. Ancient record of events, myths.

Taught by: Burckle

 

01:460:212. EARTH AND LIFE THROUGH TIME (3 credits)

Relationship between the development of continents and oceans, changes in sedimentary environments, and the evolution of life through time.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

01:460:330. SEDIMENTARY GEOLOGY (4 credits)

Interpretation of sedimentary rocks; their relation to depositional environment and processes. Analysis of sedimentary sequences in time and space. Principles of correlation.

Taught by: Feibel

 

01:460:340. SEDIMENTOLOGY (4 credits)

Interpretation of sediments and sedimentary rocks, with emphasis on processes in recent sedimentary environments and their ancient analogs.

Taught by: Ashley

 

01:460:341. STRATIGRAPHY (4 credits)

Analysis of sedimentary rocks of earth’s crust; their distribution in time and space; principles of correlation. Seismic interpretation of reflection records.

Taught by: Miller

 

01:460:303. PALEONTOLOGY (4 credits)

Principles of paleontology. Classification, relationships, and evolutionary history of invertebrate fossils. Laboratory study of morphology of invertebrates.

Taught by: McGhee

 

01:460:408. GEOMORPHOLOGY (3 credits)

Evolution and classification of landforms and the processes involved in their development.

Taught by: Ashley

 

01:460:429. TECTONICS AND REGIONAL STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY (3 credits)

Theories of tectonics, regional tectonostratigraphic analysis, development of the earth’s Phanerozoic orogens.

Taught by: Withjack

 

01:460:434. THE QUARTERNARY PERIOD (3 credits)

Glaciology and glacial geology; study of erosion and deposition by glaciers; creation of landforms; effect of the glacial period on flora and fauna.

Taught by: Ashley

 

01:460:453. PALEOECOLOGY (3 credits)

Evolution in an ecological context: analysis of ancient living systems; evolution of marine ecosystems in geologic time.

Taught by: McGhee

 

01:460:454. MICROPALEONTOLOGY (3 credits)

Studies of foraminifera, calcareous nannoplankton, and siliceous microplankton emphasizing stratigraphic, paleoecologic, and paleoceanographic utility.

Taught by: Aubry

 

01:460:476. HISTORY OF THE EARTH SYSTEM (3 credits)

Introduction to major processes that have shaped Earth’s environment, including climatic processes on geological time scales, the evolution of organisms, the cycling of elements, and the feedback between these processes.

Taught by: Paul Falkowski

 

MARINE SCIENCES
(see also course web page)

 

11:628:309 TOPICS: MOLECULAR OCEANOGRAPHY (3 credits) 

From microbes to whales, the molecular techniques recently introduced in Oceanography have profoundly influenced our way of studying marine biodiversity, ecology, and evolution. This course will provide a general survey of the various molecular tools used in the study of the ocean. A wide range o newly developed scientific fields, such as phylogenetics, phylogeography, genomics, population genetics, or molecular ecology, will be introduced. After an introduction of their theoretical principles, examples of applications to address basic questions in marine biology will be presented, and key scientific papers in each of those fields will be discussed.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

11:628:321. Ichthyology (4 credits)

The biology of fish with emphasis on functional morphology, ecology, and behavior.

Taught by: Able.

 

11:628:340. Identification of Marine Invertebrates (2 credits)

Identification of Marine Invertebrates is a one-week intersession 2-credit class. It is held at the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences on the Cook Campus and is comprised of a field trip to the Rutgers Marine Field Station, collection of specimens, laboratory work, and lectures by Dr. Fred Grassle.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

ECOLOGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES

 

11:704:323. ORNITHOLOGY (4 credits)

The biology, ecology, and field identification of birds of the region.

Taught by:  See catalogue.

 

11:704:324. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (4 credits)

Comparative study of some representative invertebrates as a basis for understanding the interrelationship between the physiological activity and the structure of organisms.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

11:704:325. VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (4 credits)

The classification, evolution, ecology, and life histories of the order and families of the vertebrates, especially of the eastern United States.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

11:704:411. TAXONOMY OF VASCULAR PLANTS (4 credits)

An overview of the evolution and diversity of vascular plants, from ferns to conifers and flowering plants. Field identification, morphology, principles of classification, and basic concepts in evolutionary research.

Taught by: Lena Struwe

 

11:704:486. PRINCIPLES OF EVOLUTION (3 credits)

Theories, principles, and mechanisms of the evolution of cellular and organismic systems, with some attention to human evolutionary studies.

Taught by: Peter Smouse

 

PLANT SCIENCE

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ANTHROPOLOGY

(see also course web page)

 

16:070:508. EVOLUTIONARY THEORY AND PROCESSES (3 credits)

Natural selection, adaptation, evolutionary genetics, speciation, extinction, adaptive radiation, and macroevolution with special emphasis on human and nonhuman primate evolution. Role of applied anthropology in facilitating broad public participation in development projects and other kinds of change initiatives; ethics and professional practice.

Taught by: Susan Cachel

 

16:070:558. EVOLUTION OF THE HOMINIDAE (3 credits)

The fossil Old-World higher primates; the Miocene fossil apes; problems of when, where, and why hominids first appeared; the australopithecines of Plio/Pleistocene Africa; early genus Homo; Homo erectus; Neanderthals; the appearance of anatomically modern man; Paleolithic cultures.

Taught by: Susan Cachel

 

16:070:559. EVOLUTION OF BEHAVIOR (3 credits)

Consideration of human and primate behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Topics include aggression, territorial behavior, sexuality and mating systems, socialization, and sex roles in primate society. not provided for in formal courses. Conferences, reading, and laboratory work arranged in consultation with the professor in charge.

Taught by: Lee Cronk

 

16:070:560. NATURAL SELECTION AND SOCIAL THEORY (3 credits) 

Recent papers on key topics in social evolution, such as female choice, symmetry, parasites, virulence, kinship, homosexuality, reciprocal altruism, and self-deception. Special emphasis on human data 

Taught by: Robert Trivers

 

16:070:561. HUMAN BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY (3 credits)

Review of major issues and recent research in behavioral ecology and related approaches to human behavior.

Taught by: Lee Cronk

 

16:070:563    Biology of Social Bonds (3 credits)

The dynamics of basic social bonds, such as the mother-child bond, the mating bond, the bond between older and younger males, and the sibling bond, analyzed in terms of their evolution and of their significance for micro and macro social structures.

Taught by:  Ryne Palombit

 

16:070:564. PROBLEMS IN THE BIOLOGY OF SOCIAL RELATIONS (3 credits)

The place of biology in the social sciences, relevance of the comparative sociology of animal societies; the phylogeny of behavior; special problems of aggression, territory, sexual and parental relationships, and language.

Taught by: Robert Trivers

 

16:070:566. HUMAN OSTEOLOGY (3 credits)

Examination of primate morphology, with emphasis on the evolution of human morphological adaptations.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

16:070:568. Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3 credits)

Adaptive links among social systems, life histories, and ecology of nonhuman primates, as understood with natural selection and kin selection theory.

Taught by: Ryne Palombit

 

16:070:578. OLD WORLD PREHISTORY (3 credits)

Key data and current interpretive model concerning the archaeology of hominid adaptations from earliest times through the Neolithic in the Old World. 

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

16:070:579. NEW WORLD PREHISTORY (3 credits)

Key data and current interpretive models concerning the form, stability, and change of cultures throughout the pre-Columbian New World.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

16:070:567. HUMAN VARIATION (3 credits)

Variation in body size, shape. Structural morphology, pigmentation, and biochemistry among living humans; climatic adaptation, disease, and human evolution; population origins through migration or local continuity through evolutionary time.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

16:070:569. Sex Differences and Sexual Selection in Primates (3 credits)

Methods, findings, theoretical developments of sexual selection studies in primates.  Evolution of sex differences in behavior, sexuality, and morphology.  Focus on primates in the comparative framework of studies of other organisms.

Taught by: Ryne Palombit

 

16:070:570. HOMINID TAXONOMY AND SYSTEMATICS (3 credits)

Implications of the existence of sympatric species; limits to similarity imposed by the coexistence of competing species; controversies surrounding the establishment of taxa; phylogenetic reconstructions .

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

16:070:571. PRIMATE EVOLUTION AND RADIATIONS (3 credits)

Exploration of primate history in terms of evolutionary radiations. Emphasis on entrance to and radiation within new adaptive zones and the change of these zones through time, using morphological and paleoecological information.

Taught by: Susan Cachel

 

16:070:574. Field Methods in Primatology (3 credits)

Current techniques for quantifying and sampling behavior in the field. Specialized subjects include: habitat description, phenology, audio recording, experimental design (playbacks), capture/immobilization, hormonal and DNA sampling, GPS/GIS, equipment.

Taught by: Ryne Palombit

 

16:070:582. PALEOECOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY (3 credits)

Methods of environmental reconstruction. Emphasis on the evolution of subsistence economies, with special attention to the origins of animal and plant domestication.

Taught by: Robert Blumenschine

 

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MICROBIOLOGY

(see also course web page)

 

16:681:572. Microbial Ecology and Biodiversity (4 credits)

The course introduces students to microbial life in natural environments by focusing on the diversity of microbes and their interactions in soils, aquatic systems, the plant and animal body. Current issues in Microbial ecology and state-of-the-arts methodologies are stressed.  While the scientific basis governing processes and interactions is the focus of the course, frequent references are made to the implications of the described phenomena to man’s ability to manage his environment. 

Taught by: T. Barkay.

 

ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION

(see also course web page)

 

16:215:507. ADVANCED PLANT SYSTEMATICS (4 credits)

Broad, evolutionary overview of all vascular plants, from club mosses and ferns to conifers and flowering plants. Principles of classification and field identification, morphology, and basic concepts in evolutionary studies in botany. Independent project.

Taught by: Lena Struwe

 

16:215:513. POPULATION GENETICS (3 credits)

Factors affecting gene frequencies in populations and leading to the origin of new species. An introduction to the analysis of continuously distributed polygenic traits.

Taught by: Peter Smouse (by arrangement, contact Peter Smouse for information)

 

16:215:550. ADVANCED EVOLUTION (4 credits)

Examination of the major elements and controversies of evolutionary theory. Emphasis on genetic variation, natural selection, adaptation, and speciation.

Taught by: Steven Handel, Jody Hey

 

16:215:570. MOLECULAR EVOLUTION (3 credits)

Analysis of actual data sets estimating historical process. Evolutionary origins of DNA; theoretical and empirical aspects; using DNA sequence data to determine evolutionary history.

Taught by: Jody Hey

 

16:215:575. QUANTITATIVE ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION (3 credits)

A survey of the application of multivariate statistical methods to the analysis of problems in ecology and evolution. Topics covered include cluster analysis, ordination, discriminant function analysis, canonical correlation, multivariate analysis of variance, and analysis of repeated measures.

Taught by: Peter Morin

 

16:215:587. CONCEPTS AND METHODS IN EVOLUTION (4 credits)

Lecture, laboratory, and field survey of selected concepts in evolutionary biology. Topics include predator-prey interactions, mutualisms, population variation, genetic structure of populations, spatial patterning, speciation, systematics, and cladistics, among others.

Taught by: Karl Kjer, Peter Smouse, Ted Stiles

 

ENTOMOLOGY

(see also course web page)

 

16:370:511. PRINCIPLES OF SYSTEMATICS (3 credits)

Taxonomy, species concepts, methods of contemporary systematic research, and zoogeographic analysis.

Taught by: Karl Kjer

 

16:370:519. INSECT BEHAVIOR (3 credits)

Insect behavior from a functional standpoint: stimuli and responses; adaptative significance and evolutionary context; underlying physiological mechanisms.

Taught by: Mike May

 

16:370:524. INSECT TAXONOMY (4 credits)

Insect systematics, identification, natural history, and evolution. Emphasizes North American insects at the family level.

Taught by: Karl Kjer

 

16:370:605 Insect Collection (1 credit)

Students make a properly curated, labeled, and identified insect collection.

Taught by: Karl Kjer

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

(see also course web page)

 

16:375:510. Environmental and Pollution Microbiology (3 credits)

Microorganisms as polluters and purifiers of the environment. Biological cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and other elements; sewage and solid waste treatment; sanitary bacteriology.

Taught by: L. Young & J. Kukor

 

16:375:529. Biodegradation and Bioremediation (3 credits)

This course presents the basic principles of biodegradation science and shows how those principles are related to the growing bioremediation industry. Major foci include environmental, chemical, engineering, microbiological and technological aspects of the discipline; fate and persistence of contaminants in complex environmental matrices; and microbial transformation and destruction of pollutants.

Taught by: J. Kukor

 

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
(see also course web page)

 

16:460:503. STUDIES IN PALEONTOLOGY (3 credits)

Topics include methods and case studies in systematics, evolution and extinction, paleogeography, paleoclimate, and other topics of current interest. Emphasis on the relationship between geological and biological processes.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

16:460:505. SEDIMENTARY GEOLOGY (3 credits)

Topics of current interdisciplinary research in sedimentary geology. Sequence stratigraphy, facies models, sea-level change, unconformities/hiatuses, tectonics, climate change, cyclicity, evolution, mass extinctions.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

16:460:519. MESOZOIC-CENOZOIC STRATIGRAPHY (3 credits)

Study of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic stratigraphic sequences in different basinal settings and relationship to tectonic history.

Taught by: Miller

 

16:460:538. EVOLUTIONARY PALEOECOLOGY (3 credits)

Evolution of ecological systems in geologic time; application of evolutionary theory to paleoecological patterns and processes.

Taught by: McGhee

 

16:460:561. STUDIES IN MICROPALEONTOLOGY (3 credits)

Paleoecology and biostratigraphy of foraminifera; identification and interpretation of microscopic organic remains in rocks and sediments.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

OCEANOGRAPHY
(see also course web page)

 

16:712:524. Early Life History of Fish (3 credits)

The phylogeny, morphology, life history, ecology, and behavior of fish during the egg, larval, and juvenile stages. Detailed treatments of representative estuarine marine and freshwater fish.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

16:712:525 Molecular Oceanography (3)

From microbes to whales, the molecular techniques recently introduced in Oceanography have profoundly influenced our way of studying marine biodiversity, ecology, and evolution. This course will provide a general survey of the various molecular tools used in the study of the ocean. A wide range o newly developed scientific fields, such as phylogenetics, phylogeography, genomics, population genetics, or molecular ecology, will be introduced. After an introduction of their theoretical principles, examples of applications to address basic questions in marine biology will be presented, and key scientific papers in each of those fields will be discussed.

Taught by: See catalogue.

 

16:712:560. HISTORY OF THE EARTH SYSTEM (3 credits)

Introduction to major processes that have shaped Earth’s environment, including climatic processes on geological time scales, the evolution of organisms, the cycling of elements, and the feedback between these processes.

Taught by: Paul Falkowski

 

PLANT BIOLOGY

(see also course web page)

 

16:765:503. METHODS IN PLANT SYSTEMATICS (4 credits)

Hands-on course in plant systematics methods and techniques used in plant systematics, phylogenetics, and biogeography. Lab, software demos, and lectures will be intermingled with independent projects and discussions.

Taught by: Lena Struwe

 

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